Memory Alpha

Editing

Battle of the Mutara Nebula

1
  • The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit. If you are undoing an edit that is …
Latest revision Your text
Line 64: Line 64:
   
 
=== Background information ===
 
=== Background information ===
The battle, as ultimately visualized, was conceived by Production Designer [[Joe Jennings]] and Art Director [[Mike Minor]]. At the "Star Trek Designers Talk Trek History At Art Directors Guild Event" in {{y|2009}}, Jennings recalled how the battle was originally scripted as having the two vessels pounding at each other at close range in open space. He considered the battle thus scripted – likening it to a man-o'-war slugging match from the era of sail – ludicrous, pointing out that, more realistically, spaceships would go at each other in high-speed passes under open space circumstances (as was adopted in the [[Battle of Wolf 359]] and [[Dominion War]] battle scenes in their respective, later {{s|DS9}} episodes, as well as in the {{s|TNG}} films, most notably {{film|8}}). Together with Minor, Jennings came up with the concept of the Mutara Nebula knocking out both ships' navigational and tactical systems as a more believable rationale for the slower-paced close quarter combat between the two vessels, which was ultimately accepted by the writing staff. After the sequence was filmed, Jennings gleefully recalled Director [[Nicholas Meyer]]'s reaction; "''You were right. Thanks for not saying so!''" (''[[Star Trek: 45 Years of Designing the Future]]'')
+
The battle, as ultimately visualized, was conceived by Production Designer [[Joe Jennings]] and Art Director [[Mike Minor]]. At the "Star Trek Designers Talk Trek History At Art Directors Guild Event" in {{y|2009}}, Jennings recalled how the battle was originally scripted as having the two vessels pounding at each other at close range in open space. He considered the battle thus scripted – likening it to a man-o'-war slugging match from the era of sail – ludicrous, pointing out that, more realistically, spaceships would go at each other in high-speed passes under open space circumstances (as was adopted in the [[Battle of Wolf 359]] and [[Dominion War]] battle scenes in their respective, later {{s|4}} episodes, as well as in the {{s|3}} films, most notably {{film|8}}). Together with Minor, Jennings came up with the concept of the Mutara Nebula knocking out both ships' navigational and tactical systems as a more believable rationale for the slower-paced close quarter combat between the two vessels, which was ultimately accepted by the writing staff. After the sequence was filmed, Jennings gleefully recalled Director [[Nicholas Meyer]]'s reaction; "''You were right. Thanks for not saying so!''" (''[[Star Trek: 45 Years of Designing the Future]]'')
   
 
An element in the battle Joe Jennings considered equally ridiculous, but was not able to change, were the handlings performed in the [[torpedo bay]] – as the photon torpedos should have been fired directly from storage. In an interview in the [[Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (The Director's Edition)|''Star Trek II'' director's edition]] [[DVD]] special feature "Designing Khan", he said that seeing the [[ensign]]s with hooks pulling the grating off the torpedo conveyor before launching it drove him crazy, since any real ship that took that long to load weapons would probably be destroyed in about ten seconds. Coincidentally, Jennings' concerns in this respect were later addressed by Nicholas Meyer in {{film|6}}, where it was indeed strongly implied that torpedos were fired directly from storage in {{st-minutiae|resources/scripts/tuc.txt|scene 55}}, in which Captain Montgomery Scott uttered the line, "''Negative, Captain. According to Inventory we're still fully loaded,''" after the ''[[Kronos One]]'' was unexpectedly hit by a torpedo volley from the ''Enterprise''{{'}}s torpedo bay.
 
An element in the battle Joe Jennings considered equally ridiculous, but was not able to change, were the handlings performed in the [[torpedo bay]] – as the photon torpedos should have been fired directly from storage. In an interview in the [[Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (The Director's Edition)|''Star Trek II'' director's edition]] [[DVD]] special feature "Designing Khan", he said that seeing the [[ensign]]s with hooks pulling the grating off the torpedo conveyor before launching it drove him crazy, since any real ship that took that long to load weapons would probably be destroyed in about ten seconds. Coincidentally, Jennings' concerns in this respect were later addressed by Nicholas Meyer in {{film|6}}, where it was indeed strongly implied that torpedos were fired directly from storage in {{st-minutiae|resources/scripts/tuc.txt|scene 55}}, in which Captain Montgomery Scott uttered the line, "''Negative, Captain. According to Inventory we're still fully loaded,''" after the ''[[Kronos One]]'' was unexpectedly hit by a torpedo volley from the ''Enterprise''{{'}}s torpedo bay.
  Loading editor