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Death is sometimes perceived as an event that is common to all living things. In [[2366]], Captain Jean-Luc Picard used death and his own mortality as a way to show [[Nuria]] and her [[Mintakan|people]] that he was no different than they were, and certainly not a [[god]] they named "the Picard". ({{TNG|Who Watches The Watchers}})
 
Death is sometimes perceived as an event that is common to all living things. In [[2366]], Captain Jean-Luc Picard used death and his own mortality as a way to show [[Nuria]] and her [[Mintakan|people]] that he was no different than they were, and certainly not a [[god]] they named "the Picard". ({{TNG|Who Watches The Watchers}})
   
According to [[Apollo]], the race of the [[Greek god]]s was immortal, but also for them there was a point of no return. As their species could alter their form, it was possible for them to spread so thin that they would disappear from existence. Apollo poetically described this event as returning to the [[cosmos]] on the wings of the wind. Apollo was the last of the gods to die in [[2267]]. ({{TOS|Who Mourns for Adonais?}})
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According to [[Apollo]], the race of the [[Greek god]]s was immortal, but also for them there was a point of no return. As their species could alter their form, they could spread themselves so thin that they would disappear from existence. Apollo poetically described this event as returning to the [[cosmos]] on the wings of the wind. Apollo was the last of the gods to die in [[2267]]. ({{TOS|Who Mourns for Adonais?}})
 
[[Sargon]] considered himself dead although his mind was stored and active in energy-form inside a [[receptacle]]. He described the final destruction of his consciousness as departing to oblivion. ({{TOS|Return to Tomorrow}})
 
   
 
The [[Borg Collective]] considered death to be an irrelevant concept in [[Borg philosophy|their philosophy]]. ({{TNG|The Best of Both Worlds}}) When a [[Borg drone|drone]] was damaged beyond repair, it was simply discarded. All of the drones experiences and memories lived on inside the collective consciousness. This was considered immortality by the Borg. ({{VOY|Mortal Coil}})
 
The [[Borg Collective]] considered death to be an irrelevant concept in [[Borg philosophy|their philosophy]]. ({{TNG|The Best of Both Worlds}}) When a [[Borg drone|drone]] was damaged beyond repair, it was simply discarded. All of the drones experiences and memories lived on inside the collective consciousness. This was considered immortality by the Borg. ({{VOY|Mortal Coil}})
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