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In [[2369]], while explaining the nature of linear [[time]] to the [[Prophet]]s, [[Commander]] [[Benjamin Sisko]] also explained the concept of death, stating that [[Jennifer Sisko]] was a most important part of his existence, but that he had "lost her some time ago." The Prophets, however, showed him that he spent much time in his mind dwelling on Jennifer's death, reliving his tragic experience on the {{USS|Saratoga|NCC-31911}}, that he "existed" there, something that was most certainly not linear. ({{DS9|Emissary}})
 
In [[2369]], while explaining the nature of linear [[time]] to the [[Prophet]]s, [[Commander]] [[Benjamin Sisko]] also explained the concept of death, stating that [[Jennifer Sisko]] was a most important part of his existence, but that he had "lost her some time ago." The Prophets, however, showed him that he spent much time in his mind dwelling on Jennifer's death, reliving his tragic experience on the {{USS|Saratoga|NCC-31911}}, that he "existed" there, something that was most certainly not linear. ({{DS9|Emissary}})
 
The [[scientist]]s [[Doctor|Dr.]] [[Bathkin]] and Dr. [[Elias Giger]] held unusual beliefs regarding death, believing that most if not all "natural deaths" were the result of [[cellular ennui]], or the boredom of a body's [[Cell (biology)|cells]]. This [[theory]] was generally held low regard by the general scientific establishment, which Giger derided as being "[[soul]]less minions of orthodoxy." ({{DS9|In the Cards}})
 
   
 
Many cultures considered death to be something welcomed, not feared. These included [[Klingon]]s, whose culture put a high premium on [[honor]]able death, and the [[Vaadwaur]], whose children were taught to fall a[[sleep]] each night imagining different ways to die. ({{VOY|Dragon's Teeth}})
 
Many cultures considered death to be something welcomed, not feared. These included [[Klingon]]s, whose culture put a high premium on [[honor]]able death, and the [[Vaadwaur]], whose children were taught to fall a[[sleep]] each night imagining different ways to die. ({{VOY|Dragon's Teeth}})
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