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Miss, also abbreviated as Ms., was a title given to unmarried women. In contrast, a married woman would be addressed as "Missus"; whereas, the male equivalent of both titles was "Mister". It was applied to female civilians and crew members during the 23rd and 24th centuries.

Leonard McCoy, who while under the influence of pod plant spores on Omicron Ceti III, began reverting back to the character of his Southern roots, where he enjoyed a thick accent, a mint julep, and referred to Leila Kalomi as "Miss Leila". (TOS: "This Side of Paradise")

Curiously, Captain Kathryn Janeway referred to Amelia Earhart as "Miss Earhart", when addressing her, despite her having had a husband . (VOY: "The 37's")

The term was also often used with a female with whom a male was not acquainted. (DS9: "The Storyteller"; VOY: "Alter Ego") James T. Kirk, and later Leonard McCoy, both referred to Edith Keeler as miss. (TOS: "The City on the Edge of Forever")

When Pavel Chekov was introduced to Tamoon on Triskelion in 2268, he nervously responded, "Oh, pleased, pleased to know you, miss." When she informed him that he was a fine specimen and that she would instruct him well, he offered, "that's very kind of you, miss, but...", before she continued to discuss her intentions for them to be selected for each other. (TOS: "The Gamesters of Triskelion")

In other cases, miss would be stated as if it was a question when the female's name was not know, leaving it open for them to volunteer their name. (TNG: "A Fistful of Datas"; VOY: "Fair Haven")

The Malcorian named Lanel, who upon learning that the disguised William T. Riker was an alien, she informed him that she "always wanted to make love with an alien." Riker attempted to interpose with "Listen, Miss...", at which point she shared her name, "Lanel, I really have to get going. All the other aliens are waiting for me." (TNG: "First Contact")

Women addressed as miss Edit

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