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Past Prologue (episode)

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: - '''Garak''', to Bashir
 
: - '''Garak''', to Bashir
   
== Background information ==
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==Background information==
=== Story and script ===
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===Story and script===
 
* In [[Katharyn Powers]]' original conception of this episode, Kira and Tahna were to be former lovers, but [[Michael Piller]] decided that this was a television cliché. Powers' version also had Kira persuade Tahna to turn his back on terrorism and attempt to forge peace with the Cardassians, before being killed by his own people. Despite the changes, Powers remarked, "''As filmed, the story was structurally very close to my original conception.''" (''[[Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages]]'', p. 41)
 
* In [[Katharyn Powers]]' original conception of this episode, Kira and Tahna were to be former lovers, but [[Michael Piller]] decided that this was a television cliché. Powers' version also had Kira persuade Tahna to turn his back on terrorism and attempt to forge peace with the Cardassians, before being killed by his own people. Despite the changes, Powers remarked, "''As filmed, the story was structurally very close to my original conception.''" (''[[Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages]]'', p. 41)
* While Katharyn Powers is the solely credited writer on this episode, the [[script|teleplay]] credits her only for the story, with Producer [[Peter Allan Fields]] being credited as the teleplay writer. [http://www.st-minutiae.com/resources/scripts/404.txt] According to Michael Piller, Fields didn't work alone on the episode. "''We were still searching for a style. Peter worked on that story and I worked on it a little bit with him,''" Piller attested. "''We struggled early on to find Kira's voice in those scenes.''" ({{STDS9|3|11}}) Fields added both the character of Garak and a scene between Odo and Kira to the plot. "''It was terribly important to put in a scene between Odo and Kira that establishes trust between them,''" he said, "''and the idea that she would turn to him when she didn't know where else to turn or what to do.''" Regarding the addition of Garak to the storyline, Fields commented, "''We needed a character whom Lursa and B'Etor would come to as a kind of go-between.''" The writers didn't want the character to act like an out-and-out spy nor like a typical Cardassian. "''I finally put him in a tailor shop, and nobody hit me, so we kept him there,''" Fields recalled, with a chuckle. (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'', p. 22)
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* While Katharyn Powers is the solely credited writer on this episode, the [[script|teleplay]] credits her only for the story, with Producer [[Peter Allan Fields]] being credited as the teleplay writer. [http://www.st-minutiae.com/resources/scripts/404.txt] According to Michael Piller, Fields didn't work alone on the episode. "''We were still searching for a style. Peter worked on that story and I worked on it a little bit with him,''" Piller attested. "''We struggled early on to find Kira's voice in those scenes.''" ({{STDS9|3|11}})
* The [[Duras sisters]], [[Lursa]] and [[B'Etor]], were included in this episode's plot at Michael Piller's suggestion. (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'', p. 22) It was part of an attempt to tie ''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine|Deep Space Nine]]'' into existing ''[[Star Trek]]'' continuity. "''Essentially, we had a story,''" recalled Piller, "''and, in the case of Lursa and B'Etor, we said, 'Hey, we've got a real kind of {{wt|Casablanca (film)|Casablanca}} spy story and we need someone to really be doing double dealings and bringing money and doing gun exchanges; why don't we use the [[Klingon]]s – and use those characters that we love so much?{{'}}''" While doing so, however, the writing staff was careful to nonetheless maintain the episode's focus on one of the series' principal characters. "''In 'Past Prologue', there's a moral dilemma for Major Kira where she has to confront her loyalty to her past life and what her new life is going to be,''" [[Ira Steven Behr]] pointed out. "''It's really about her. It's illuminating our new characters.''" (''[[Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages]]'', p. 42)
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* The writers decided to include the [[Duras sisters]], [[Lursa]] and [[B'Etor]], in this episode's plot as part of an attempt to tie ''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine|Deep Space Nine]]'' into existing ''[[Star Trek]]'' continuity. "''Essentially, we had a story,''" recalled Michael Piller, "''and, in the case of Lursa and B'Etor, we said, 'Hey, we've got a real kind of ''Casablanca'' spy story and we need someone to really be doing double dealings and bringing money and doing gun exchanges; why don't we use the [[Klingon]]s – and use those characters that we love so much?{{'}}''" While doing so, however, the writing staff was careful to nonetheless maintain the episode's focus on one of the series' principal characters. "''In 'Past Prologue', there's a moral dilemma for Major Kira where she has to confront her loyalty to her past life and what her new life is going to be,''" [[Ira Steven Behr]] pointed out. "''It's really about her. It's illuminating our new characters.''" (''[[Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages]]'', p. 42)
   
=== Cast and characters ===
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===Cast and characters===
* [[Elim Garak]] actor [[Andrew Robinson]] was highly impressed with the writing of this episode, so much so that he believed Garak practically created himself, as the writing gave Robinson a very strong impression of how to play the role. (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'', p. 22) Furthermore, Robinson revealed that, during their getting to know each other in this episode, Garak's interest in Bashir clearly was purely sexual. (''[[What We Left Behind]]'') When interviewed by Amazon.com, the performer stated, "''Originally, in that very first episode, I loved the man's absolute fearlessness about presenting himself to an attractive Human being. The fact that the attractive Human being is a man (Bashir) doesn't make any difference to him.''"
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* Since this episode introduces [[Andrew Robinson]] as [[Elim Garak]], getting his characterization right was important to both the crew and the actor himself. Of the origins of the character, Peter Allan Fields said that "''we needed a [[Cardassian]] who didn't act like one, so I finally put him in a tailor shop, and nobody hit me, so we kept him there.''" Director [[Winrich Kolbe]] said of the performance that "''we agreed that Andy could push the envelope, but he couldn't leave the Cardassian platform. We had long talks about wardrobe and makeup, but we also talked about attitude, so that he would retain that stiffness that you see in all Cardassians.''" Finally, Andrew Robinson himself said of the character, "''He's all subtext. If a smart guy like Garak says that he's 'plain and simple', you realize that he's not plain and not simple. And that there is a lot going on. Regardless of how innocuous or simple each line is, there's always something going on underneath that belies the line. And his eyes and the tone of his voice say something different than the words he's speaking. It's not an easy thing to work with subtext, but when you do it well, you really get people's attention.''" (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'') Robinson also revealed that, during their getting to know each other in this episode, Garak's interest in Bashir clearly was purely sexual. (''[[What We Left Behind]]'')
 
* [[Barbara March]] and [[Gwynyth Walsh]] found their participation in this episode was minor. March commented, "''We were only in the episode briefly, and we didn't have much to do. I was hoping they'd give us an action-packed episode, where we could fight and use our weapons and kick a little more butt! Also, we didn't really get to work with the show's main cast – we were either alone or with one character.''" Walsh commented, "''I think they brought us back because it was time. It was fine. It was lovely to work with [[Rene Auberjonois|Rene ''[Auberjonois]'']], but we mostly worked just by ourselves in that one. We didn't have that much interaction with anyone else.''" ("Double Trouble", {{STM|36}})
 
* [[Barbara March]] and [[Gwynyth Walsh]] found their participation in this episode was minor. March commented, "''We were only in the episode briefly, and we didn't have much to do. I was hoping they'd give us an action-packed episode, where we could fight and use our weapons and kick a little more butt! Also, we didn't really get to work with the show's main cast – we were either alone or with one character.''" Walsh commented, "''I think they brought us back because it was time. It was fine. It was lovely to work with [[Rene Auberjonois|Rene ''[Auberjonois]'']], but we mostly worked just by ourselves in that one. We didn't have that much interaction with anyone else.''" ("Double Trouble", {{STM|36}})
* [[Admiral]] [[Rollman]] was played by [[Leonard Nimoy]]'s wife [[Susan Bay]]. According to Bay herself, her casting in the role wasn't due to her being married to Nimoy but was because she had a long-standing relationship with Executive Producer [[Rick Berman]] and had a previous working relationship with Casting Director [[Junie Lowry-Johnson]]. (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'', p. 22)
 
   
=== Production ===
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===Production===
* The change which takes place in [[Kira Nerys|Kira]]'s hairstyle from the pilot episode, {{e|Emissary}}, was at the request of [[Nana Visitor]] herself; "''I just didn't feel that Major Kira would style her hair every day. She wouldn't care! I wanted a hairstyle that looked like she just woke up in the morning looking like that.''" (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'', p. 21)
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* The change which takes place in [[Kira Nerys|Kira]]'s hairstyle from the pilot episode, {{e|Emissary}}, was at the request of [[Nana Visitor]] herself; "''I just didn't feel that Major Kira would style her hair every day. She wouldn't care! I wanted a hairstyle that looked like she just woke up in the morning looking like that.''" (''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion]]'')
 
* Although this episode was the first to air after the show's pilot "Emissary", it was actually produced after {{e|A Man Alone}} (which was, in production order, the only episode between the pilot and this installment).
 
* Although this episode was the first to air after the show's pilot "Emissary", it was actually produced after {{e|A Man Alone}} (which was, in production order, the only episode between the pilot and this installment).
 
* This is the first episode of the series to be directed by [[Winrich Kolbe]].
 
* This is the first episode of the series to be directed by [[Winrich Kolbe]].
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* Although he mistakenly cited the incident as being in {{e|Emissary}}, Winrich Kolbe was impressed by the confrontation between Sisko and Kira in which he warns her that, if she ever goes over his head again, he'll serve hers on a silver platter. "''I love that. That, to me, is more human, it is more contemporary ''[….]'' It intrigued me because I felt that, yes, we are changing, but we are not necessarily becoming more advanced. There's nationalism two thousand years from now, and it will always be there, because it's something genetically inside us. Like racism, which is something that's always coming out. We only ''seemingly'' live in a better social society if we are able to combat it, but the moment we let our guard down, bingo, there's the conflict.''" (''[[The Fifty-Year Mission: The Next 25 Years]]'', pp. 448-449) Kolbe also approved of Andrew Robinson's performance in this episode, commenting, "[He]'' turned out to be terrific.''" (''[[Cinefantastique]]'', Vol. 24, No. 3/4, p. 91)
 
* Although he mistakenly cited the incident as being in {{e|Emissary}}, Winrich Kolbe was impressed by the confrontation between Sisko and Kira in which he warns her that, if she ever goes over his head again, he'll serve hers on a silver platter. "''I love that. That, to me, is more human, it is more contemporary ''[….]'' It intrigued me because I felt that, yes, we are changing, but we are not necessarily becoming more advanced. There's nationalism two thousand years from now, and it will always be there, because it's something genetically inside us. Like racism, which is something that's always coming out. We only ''seemingly'' live in a better social society if we are able to combat it, but the moment we let our guard down, bingo, there's the conflict.''" (''[[The Fifty-Year Mission: The Next 25 Years]]'', pp. 448-449) Kolbe also approved of Andrew Robinson's performance in this episode, commenting, "[He]'' turned out to be terrific.''" (''[[Cinefantastique]]'', Vol. 24, No. 3/4, p. 91)
 
* [[Ira Steven Behr]] liked the moment when O'Brien ignores Bashir excitedly revealing, in Ops, that he has been talking with Garak. "''O'Brien just gives Bashir a look, that's like 'Get the hell away from me, kid.' It's funny, it's good, and it's character,''" said Behr. (''[[Captains' Logs: The Unauthorized Complete Trek Voyages]]'', p. 336)
 
* [[Ira Steven Behr]] liked the moment when O'Brien ignores Bashir excitedly revealing, in Ops, that he has been talking with Garak. "''O'Brien just gives Bashir a look, that's like 'Get the hell away from me, kid.' It's funny, it's good, and it's character,''" said Behr. (''[[Captains' Logs: The Unauthorized Complete Trek Voyages]]'', p. 336)
* In ''[[Cinefantastique]]'' (Vol. 24, No. 3/4, p. 91), [[Mark A. Altman]] rated this episode two-and-a-half out of four stars and critiqued the installment as a "''routine first one-hour episode that failed to live up to the promise of the pilot. Indicative of the new ''Star Trek''{{'}}s more passionate approach to character interaction is a terrific scene between Odo and Kira and Sisko's actions with a Starfleet admiral. The real standout here is the relationship between a Cardassian spy, Garak, played by an effete Andy Robinson and Siddig El Fadil as Bashir, who brings a manic enthusiasm to his role. It instills the episode with a vibrancy that's lacking in the espionage story. Klingon refugees Lursa and Bator ''[sic]'' from ''The Next Generation'' (and their wonderful [[Robert Blackman|Bob Blackman]]-designed costumes) are welcome additions.''"
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* In ''[[Cinefantastique]]'' (Vol. 24, No. 3/4, p. 91), [[Mark A. Altman]] rated this episode two-and-a-half out of four stars and critiqued the installment as a "''routine first one-hour episode that failed to live up to the promise of the pilot. Indicative of the new ''Star Trek''{{'}}s more passionate approach to character interaction is a terrific scene between Odo and Kira and Sisko's actions with a Starfleet admiral. The real standout here is the relationship between a Cardassian spy, Garak, played by an effete Andy Robinson and Siddig El Fadil as Bashir, who brings a manic enthusiasm to his role. It instills the episode with a vibrancy that's lacking in the espionage story. Klingon refugees Lursa and Bator ''[sic]'' from ''The Next Generation'' (and their wonderful Bob Blackman-designed costumes) are welcome additions.''"
* In their book ''[[Beyond the Final Frontier]]'' (p. 183), writers [[Mark Jones]] and [[Lance Parkin]] critiqued this episode as "''a solid start to the regular series with more colour added to the Bajoran political situation. The trust between Odo and Kira is neatly established, plus we have the first appearance of fan favourite Garak. The major problem is Tahna's ploy – if the bomb is powerful enough to irradiate the system, won't Bajor be affected also?''"
 
   
=== Trivia ===
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===Trivia===
* This was the first appearance of Andrew Robinson as Elim Garak in the series. Garak eventually became a recurring character, making his final appearance in the series finale {{e|What You Leave Behind}}.
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* This was the first appearance of [[Andrew Robinson]] as [[Elim Garak]] in the series. Garak eventually became a recurring character, making his final appearance in the series finale {{e|What You Leave Behind}}.
 
* The sentiments [[Tahna Los]] expresses toward the [[Federation]], as well as his phrase "Bajor for Bajorans" come back in the beginning of [[DS9 Season 2|the second season]], with a three-part story arc involving an extremist faction known as [[Alliance for Global Unity]]. ({{DS9|The Homecoming|The Circle|The Siege}})
 
* The sentiments [[Tahna Los]] expresses toward the [[Federation]], as well as his phrase "Bajor for Bajorans" come back in the beginning of [[DS9 Season 2|the second season]], with a three-part story arc involving an extremist faction known as [[Alliance for Global Unity]]. ({{DS9|The Homecoming|The Circle|The Siege}})
 
* The Cardassian method of torture, via a pain-inducing implant under the skin that leaves an unpleasant scar as seen in {{TNG|Chain of Command, Part II}} is referred to in this episode, as [[Julian Bashir]] notes scarring on Tahna Los during a medical exam.
 
* The Cardassian method of torture, via a pain-inducing implant under the skin that leaves an unpleasant scar as seen in {{TNG|Chain of Command, Part II}} is referred to in this episode, as [[Julian Bashir]] notes scarring on Tahna Los during a medical exam.
 
* This is the first time that Klingons appear on ''Deep Space Nine''.
 
* This is the first time that Klingons appear on ''Deep Space Nine''.
 
* This episode marks the only appearances of Lursa (Barbara March) and B'Etor (Gwynyth Walsh), the Duras sisters, on the series. However, their [[mirror universe]] counterparts, {{mu|Lursa}} and {{mu|B'Etor}}, were later mentioned in {{e|Crossover}} and their nephew [[Toral, son of Duras|Toral]] appears in {{e|The Sword of Kahless}}.
 
* This episode marks the only appearances of Lursa (Barbara March) and B'Etor (Gwynyth Walsh), the Duras sisters, on the series. However, their [[mirror universe]] counterparts, {{mu|Lursa}} and {{mu|B'Etor}}, were later mentioned in {{e|Crossover}} and their nephew [[Toral, son of Duras|Toral]] appears in {{e|The Sword of Kahless}}.
* After being introduced in this episode, Admiral Rollman made a second appearance in {{e|Whispers}}.
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* [[Admiral]] [[Rollman]], played by [[Leonard Nimoy]]'s wife [[Susan Bay]], later appeared in {{e|Whispers}}.
 
* The friendship between Kira and [[Odo]] is first established in this episode, and we see for the first time the great level of trust she has in him. The idea for establishing this friendship was [[Peter Allan Fields]]', who went on to explore its origins in the second season episode {{e|Necessary Evil}}.
 
* The friendship between Kira and [[Odo]] is first established in this episode, and we see for the first time the great level of trust she has in him. The idea for establishing this friendship was [[Peter Allan Fields]]', who went on to explore its origins in the second season episode {{e|Necessary Evil}}.
 
* Among the clothes seen in Garak's shop is the costume worn by [[Steven Miller]] in {{TNG|Haven}}, the [[Risa]] outfit worn by [[Sovak]] in {{TNG|Captain's Holiday}}, and one of [[Kamala]]'s dresses from {{TNG|The Perfect Mate}}.
 
* Among the clothes seen in Garak's shop is the costume worn by [[Steven Miller]] in {{TNG|Haven}}, the [[Risa]] outfit worn by [[Sovak]] in {{TNG|Captain's Holiday}}, and one of [[Kamala]]'s dresses from {{TNG|The Perfect Mate}}.
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* In {{e|The Ascent}}, Jake writes a story called "[[Past Prologue]]".
 
* In {{e|The Ascent}}, Jake writes a story called "[[Past Prologue]]".
   
=== Video and DVD releases ===
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===Video and DVD releases===
 
* [[DS9 Season 1 UK VHS|UK VHS]] release: {{d|2|August|1993}}
 
* [[DS9 Season 1 UK VHS|UK VHS]] release: {{d|2|August|1993}}
 
* As part of the US VHS release ''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - The Collector's Edition]]'': {{y|1996}}
 
* As part of the US VHS release ''[[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - The Collector's Edition]]'': {{y|1996}}
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